Friday, June 27, 2014

Do You Still Receive Catalogs in the Mail?

Back when my children were toddlers and shopping while wrangling babies was...um...an adventure, I became the "queen of catalogs." These were pre-internet days, so there was no online shopping. I ordered jeans and other clothes from catalogs I received from Lands End and L. L. Bean, I ordered toys and educational items from Hearthsong, Toys to Grow On, Bits and Pieces, Lillian Vernon, Edmund Scientifics and companies that probably don't even exist anymore and whose names I have forgotten. Gifts were purchased from Wireless, Signals and so many others. I often ordered books from Barnes & Noble, Edward R. Hamilton, Bookrak, Bas Bleu and others.


One of my favorites was Green Tiger Press, which sold (sells) artsy children's books and interesting cards and prints, often based on vintage images such as the one below (available in the greeting card and also in the art print categories).


These days I do most of my specialty (for things I can't buy locally) shopping online, although I still receive catalogs. Many online shops send buyers paper catalogs once you've ordered from them, so year round and especially at Christmas catalogs arrive in my mailbox. I enjoy looking at them, although I confess to feeling a bit guilty about all that paper being used when I can easily go online to shop (I get it, though. It's easy to forget that a store exists if you don't get a nudge now and then. Paper catalogs are gentle nudges. And they work). If you're interested in finding places that still send out catalogs, do a search of "fashion catalogs," "clothing catalogs," "children's toy catalogs," "mail order book catalogs," or whatever category strikes your fancy. You can also find some (not nearly all) catalogs via catalogs.com. If you're not sure if an online store has a paper catalog, scroll to the bottom of the page. You'll often find a "request a catalog" link there.

What catalogs do you still receive? 

Have a great day!

Myrna






6 comments:

  1. I used to receive Sears catalogues because I would buy our bathing suits there, in addition to a few household items; it especially came in handy when price matching appliances. Now I receive Long Tally Sally catalogues because I buy their (extra long) jeans online, and a couple of others I can't recall at the moment (story of my life).
    I am very grateful we still get grocery flyers, as they are MUCH faster to peruse weekly than checking out online flyers (when forever scrolling and waiting for new pages to appear).

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  2. Laney4, I totally agree on grocery flyers (and other stores). I was at a big box hardware store the other day, and they told me that their particular store is conducting an experiment by doing away with flyers. I wonder how that will work. I can't tell you how many times a flyer has lured me to a store to buy something I would never have known was on sale otherwise. I understand the need to cut back on paper, but it still doesn't seem like a wise move to me.

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  3. Live by the sword; die by the sword. That big box hardware store will learn that, if they aren't putting flyers in our vision, we will forget all about them. I need visual cues, but more importantly I need to know the sales!

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  4. I receive all kinds of catalogues in the mail. I also get all the flyers put out by the local stores. I love a bargain & do use them when making up my shopping list.

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  5. Mary, I am such a bargain hunter, too. I love it when I manage to find something I need at a good price!

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