Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Christmas Food Traditions: Contest Entry Post

We all have special foods for special events or special days (cake for birthdays, lamb cakes and ham for Easter; in the U.S., we have turkey and pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving and also cherry pie for the Fourth of July...). I'm sure that wherever you live, you can think of special traditional foods for special days.

Fried (and Baked) 'Fiona Apple' Apple Pies (0026) 

Christmas, however, seems to really key in on food: egg nog, Christmas cookies, gingerbread, roasted chestnuts...) and it's wonderful that the food traditions aren't the same the world over. I love the differences in our traditions!

In our family (we're originally from the southern states, my mother from Mississippi and the rest of us from what's known as the boot heel of Missouri, that little bit that hangs down into Arkansas). So pecan pie (so sweet but delicious) used to be a tradition. Nowadays, we've set that one aside, at least temporarily. And my mother used to bake fried apple pies every Christmas. She would buy dried apples (or dry them herself in a dehydrator), then cook the apples, make up the pies and fry them three or four at a time. It was a time-consuming task, and we knew that this wasn't the healthiest treat, but we all love those pies and we'd argue (jokingly, of course) about who snitched an extra pie or whether someone was being singled out as a favorite by being given extra pies. It's too difficult for my mother to still do that, and while one or two of us have tried to recreate the pies (I've attempted this on a small scale at home, but I don't have the magic touch), none of our pies can compare to hers. It's still a nice memory.

I'm going to conclude this with a graphic (How to Make a Full-Size Gingerbread House by Movoto, a real estate company that shares fun graphics), but before I do, here's the contest entry info below. Leave a comment and you'll be entered in the contest. If you haven't entered before, check out the contest page for more chances to enter:

In the comments section, share at least one of your favorite Christmas food treats (doesn't have to be sweet, just a traditional--or nontraditional--Christmas food that you love).  

See you in the comments!


15 comments:

  1. Turkey/mashed potatoes/gravy/dressing or ham/scalloped potatoes are traditional around here.
    Growing up, we had "Christmas crackers" (which, when pulled apart, provided a thin tissue hat one wore while eating) - and I have continued this tradition with my own family. When I couldn't remember the name of this, I went to Wikipedia, where I learned that TWO people are supposed to pull the cracker apart like a wishbone; I have been doing this wrong for over 50 years; learn something new every day!

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  2. Or maybe you've been doing it right and Wikipedia got it wrong. LOL Either way, I love the idea of Christmas crackers. I've seen them but never had the pleasure of taking part in that tradition.

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  3. I think that the crackers are originally an English tradition. We ALWAYS have them. I did know that two people have to pull them. The "snap" is quite loud.They have jokes inside & trinkets & yes, a paper hat.

    Christmas is during our Summer. This means all the Summer fruits are out. We always have a large platter of the stone fruits - peaches, plums, nectarines, apricots & cherries. There are always mangoes & watermelon too.

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  4. Sounds refreshing, Mary! I would love one of those platters right about now!

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  5. Mary, I would love to have all that fruit! And a little warmth right now. Watermelon in December? Sounds like heaven.

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  6. Every year I make my Grandma's sugar cookies. They have sour cream, lemon extract in them, so yummy. My mom made them with us, I made them every year with my kids and now I get to share with my daughter and her step children.

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  7. Shari, those sound awesome, especially with the sour cream!

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  8. me, mom, aunt, and grandmother one year made little cinnamon thingys called "pert-nears" is how there pronounced. im sure that's not how there spelled lol they were so good, but since I was diagnosed with diabetes 2 years ago I cant eat anything. except sugar free oreos, (which my local walmart hasn't had them lately) :(

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  9. We always have Pumpkin Pie and candied sweet potatoes.

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  10. Any, I understand. I have several family members with type 2 diabetes. I hope your Walmart restocks the sugar free Oreos (I wonder if you talk to the manager if they wouldn't get some in. You can't be the only person wanting them. I've had luck getting my local grocery store to pick up a couple of items I really, really wanted. It doesn't always work, but sometimes it does).

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  11. Jean, I am the maker of the pumpkin pie (I love pumpkin pie). but I only make it at Thanksgiving. This year I'm bringing a casserole and ordering a pie (French Silk) from a pie shop. They're better bakers than I am.

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  12. My favorite xmas food is a nice properly cooked glazed ham mmmmm

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  13. I'm looking forward to one next week. My sister always bakes a ham. It makes for great leftovers, too.

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  14. My mother always makes divinity and candy cane cookies for Christmas.

    slehan at juno dot com

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  15. slehan, candy cane cookies sound delicious! (I don't think I've ever had divinity).

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